Tag: New Limestone Review

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Lesion

The clinic made me sign a form of consent before the 3-D Ultrasound. Under her uniform, the nurse’s breast is pressed against the crook of my leg. She braces me for support as she eases the cold apparatus inside.

Flash Fiction by Caitlin Andrews

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Coyote Country

Remember what you were told about the proper greeting.  You must not look him directly in the eye.  You must not speak unless you are asked a direct question.  You must do what you are told.  This is very important.  Sometimes your mind wanders and you say what you are thinking.  You know this is true.  Listen.  You must do what you are told.

Flash Fiction by Sean Keck

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Fire-dogs

First Place Winner of the 2019 Ada Limón Autumn Poetry Contest judged by Julia Johnson.

Felled hickory spines the ridge. / Follow my father—ripe bar and / chain oil—drags ax. Shoulders / maul.

Poetry by Adam Moore

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Eating Ortolans

Second Place Winner in the 2019 Ada Limón Autumn Poetry Contest

My first love consumed me / fast, the way an oyster / which slides unbroken past the teeth / is pressed apart by the tongue. / She was the first women my mouth / knew and from the very first, / in that dirty pink-tile bathroom, / I understood how it felt / to want something until my lips / went raw.

Poetry by Kate Leland

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The Gift

Awarded Third Place in the 2019 Ada Limón Autumn Poetry Contest

Once, I gave my mother a memoir, I Just Lately / Started Buying Wings. There was a mother in it / like my mother’s mother: cold then slightly warmer / as my mother grew, as her tennis shoes climbed / closer to gas pedal and brake

Poetry by Lucas Jorgensen

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Dear Elizabeth Smart

Runner-up in the 2019 Ada Limón Autumn Poetry Contest

I read in a book review that you wrote My Story with a ghost. / Days after hearing your voice, / I am haunted and frantically write you / in a pocket notebook, afraid of forgetting.

Poetry by Dani DiCenzo

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